The Island

Names have been changed for anonymity in this blog

Anne and Dave live in the middle of the island. He’s a contractor and handyman. Anne cleans houses. They lived in Panama for a bit and then came back to the states. The island suits them well. They invited our little group for a spontaneous visit while we were driving golf carts down dirt roads past their home one day. Of course we stopped. That’s what one does on the island.

Julius owns a business, but prefers to live on the island so that’s what he does. He’s got a management team to run his company, so his work on the island hosting people is a labor of love. He’s one of the most hospital people I’ve ever met.

Rich and Donna are long term renters. They stay for most of the winter to escape from up north. They are embedded in the community here and have lots of friends from North and South that they visit and entertain. Both are retired and don’t need to work anymore

Gary and his wife Elaine came to the island from up north a few years ago for the first time and bought a house immediately. He owns business as well but is in the process of selling. He can work remotely or travel back and forth. Either works for him. Quite the world we live in.

James and Carol have a home on the island and live part time here. They are connectors. Generosity defines them. We have become very good friends. James never met a stranger and will lend a hand to anyone in need. Hospitality is one of their gifts.

Betsy and Rob are super handy. They live here half a year in winter and spring, and spend the remaining months up North in the snow belt when it doesn’t snow. She is an artisan, he is retired from owning a trucking business. They grow flowers, orchids to be specific, and have a little greenhouse. Rob can fix just about anything. You’ve got to be able to fix stuff on the island.

Then there’s countless others; renters and homeowners, short and long term, the boat dock numbers, the landmarks, the houses, those for sale and those not; the lending library, the dirt paths, the little church, high tide, low tide, and more.

Everyone has a story. There’s common ground on an island. There’s community if you want it. People help each other because you’re always going to need help. Spare parts don’t get thrown away easily, because you or someone else will need them at some point.

We ought to live as such in our off-island neighborhoods instead of always running about in the hustle and bustle. Neighborhoods are islands within a city or suburb, but the vibe isn’t typically there.

When is the last time we talked to our neighbor, volunteered to help at random, stopped at someone’s fire pit spontaneously, or asked someone if they had a spare valve in their toolkit?

We shouldn’t have to live on an island to build community.

Technology, Remoteness and Connection

Technological tools allow us to work remotely while still remaining in sync and in touch with our organizations. It can be terrific. Technology  also allows us to generate work rapidly and productively. Working remotely is a gift of the modern age which is facilitated by multiple platforms. It’s a blessing, but it also can disconnect us from our tribe, our people, our work comnunity, the people that we need to connect with the most.

Remote work adds flexibility and permits us to have an outside perspective that we couldn’t have had in the past. It spawns perspective, freedom and creativity for those who need changes of pace and environment.

But we also need to connect in person with the people in our physical offices or locations. Remote work and Technology should enable and facilitate more of that not less. I find myself often spending less time with people and more time serving technology platforms. This is not the correct application and use of tech.

By all means, we should work remotely to gain perspective and be flexible. We should use technology and it’s platforms to work as rapidly and productively as possible. Generate as much value as possible in those spaces.

But then connect with people on a deep level to tie things together and to build a culture that is solid. Technology should serve us, not the opposite.

This is a daily struggle of maintaining balance in our highly digital world.